I Thought I Heard a Rustling
by Alan Plater
30th November - 8th December 2001
~ Directed by Betty Janes ~

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An ex-miner turned poet is appointed writer-in-residence at Eastwood branch library. However, the senior librarian soon realises the feckless but charming Geordie is no poet. Despite this she finds him highly entertaining, much to the disgust of an earnest young man who covets the writer-in-residence role. These three find themselves in an unlikely alliance when the Libraries sub-committee proposes demolishing the library.

Betty Janes has directed many productions over the last 20 years, including Once In A While The Odd Thing Happens (1999), Our World (1997), Not About Heroes (1995) and Breaking The Code (1992).

The author writes: "The play is a comedy and is therefore about very serious things. The solemn subject addressed in this play, roughly summarised, is this:

Would you rather live in a town with twnty-seven supermarkets and one small nbranch library or a town with twenty-eight supermarkets and no branch library?

If you think that libraries are a good idea, then the next question is:

How far are you prepared to go to defend your local library?

It is also a celebration. The play celebrates the written word. It suggests, as a basis for negotiation, that books are a good idea. It celebrates the spoken word, partly through its title, which is a quotation from an a homage to the great comedian Jimmy Jones.
 
All of which is quite enough celebration fo one night. I hope."

Although best known for his television work - The Beiderbeck Affair, Barchester Chronciles and A Very British Coup, Plater's stage career has spanned over 25 years. His 1990 play, Sweet Sorrow was performed by The Company in 1998.

Cast
Carol MonzeglioEllen Scott
Andy KirtleyBill Robson
Mark JamesGerald Nutley
Claudia McKelveyMrs.Graham
Stephen WarrenBernard
Crew
Jackie ClarkStage Manager
Shirley HowlettProduction Secretary
Angela ReissProps
Jackie BeerProps
Pippa CookeWardrobe
Jean WalkerPrompt
Chris JanesLights
Paul MortonLights
Tony MasonSound

Photos by Steve Beeston Photography
Review by John Davies